Heading Logo


Judge denies motion in shooting of dogs

Published: April 12, 2017 1:59 PM
  • 1 of 1 Photos | View More Photos

ST.

CLAIRSVILLE — Belmont County Common Pleas Court Judge John Vavra recently denied a motion filed by an attorney for alleged dog killer Michael Chedester seeking to allow his client to argue he had a right according to Ohio law to shoot the dogs because they were chasing deer on his property.

[Article continues below]

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">Chedester, 59, of St.

Clairsville, is facing two counts of knowingly causing serious physical harm to a companion animal, fifth-degree felonies, for allegedly shooting and killing Emmy, a 5-year-old Weimaraner, and Bella, a 6-year-old Doberman, who were owned by former Quaker City resident Peter Byers.

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">The charges were reportedly filed under Goddard’s Law that protects companion animals.

[Article continues below]

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">The dogs were reportedly chasing deer on Chedester’s hunting property near St.

Clairsville when he shot them.

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">In March, Chedester’s attorney asked the Belmont County judge to decide if the Ohio law that allows a property owner to shoot dogs chasing animals on his property applies to his client.

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">The attorney reportedly believed Goddard’s Law does not supersede an Ohio Revised Code statute that gives landowners the right to shoot animals chasing other animals on their property.

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">The Belmont County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office said the ORC protects animals such as livestock, but not wild animals, such as the deer being chased by the dogs.

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">If convicted of the fifth-degree felony charges, Chedester faces up to two years in prison.

63636302947998px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;">Chedester’s trial is scheduled for May 4 in the Belmont County Common Pleas Court.


Rate this article

Do you want to leave a comment?   Please Log In or Register to comment.